Conference Program

Daily Schedules

Monday, November 15
  Pre-Conference Workshop
Tuesday, November 16
Wednesday, November 17
Thursday, November 18

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2021

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP*
Critical Advances in Electrophilic Drug Development
Chairs: Carola Neumann, MD, University of Pittsburgh, USA, Francisco Schopfer, PhD, MBA, University of Pittsburgh, USA and Bruce Freeman, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, USA
*Included with registration

Redox signaling affects the activity of specific enzyme isoforms. This property can be harnessed for rational drug design. Covalent drugs have resurged in recent years and several reports have demonstrated the general virtue of developing irreversible or reversible inhibitors. In fact, many modern pharmaceuticals contain electrophilic appendages with several employing a warhead that hijacks active side nucleophiles while others take advantage of nucleophilic sidechains that do not participate in enzymatic chemistry, but readily react with electrophiles. Thus, targeted covalent inhibitors and chemical probes have successfully become integral parts of drug discovery approaches for several diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, some critical challenges and questions remain regarding translational aspects. Those include target specificity and the advantages of reversible vs irreversible nature of the covalent interaction. This session will inform the audience about the latest developments in electrophilic drug development, emphasize possible ways to address these challenges and an update of covalent inhibitors in the clinic.

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP PART I: EMERGING TECHNIQUES IN DEVELOPING CYSTEINE TARGETING DRUGS

11:00 am - 11:05 am
Welcome / Part I Overview
Francisco Schopfer, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

11:05 am - 11:35 am
Challenges in Covalent Drug Design
Yimon Aye, PhD, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland

11:35 am - 12:05 pm 
DocKovalent: Functionalizing Targeted Covalent Inhibitors
Nir London, PhD, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

12:05 pm - 12:35 pm
Tethering and Targeting Cysteine Reactivity
Michelle Arkin, PhD, University of California San Francisco, USA

12:35 pm - 1:05 pm
Targeting Proteins with Photoswitchable Affinity Labels (PALs)
Dirk Trauner, PhD, New York University, USA

1:05 pm - 1:35 pm
Nitroalkenes: A Promising New Drug Class
Francisco Schopfer, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

1:35 pm - 2:30 pm
Break


SfRBM DISCOVERY AWARD LECTURE
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Mn Porphyrins - From SOD Mimicking to Thiol Signaling
Ines Batinic-Haberle, Duke University, USA


PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP PART II: EXAMPLES OF CYSTEINE TARGETING DRUGS

3:00 pm - 3:05 pm
Welcome / Part II Overview
Carola Neumann, MD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

3:05 pm - 3:35 pm
Electrophilic Inhibitors in Neurodegenerative Diseases
Stuart A. Lipton, MD, PhD, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California; University of California, San Diego; Yale School of Medicine, USA

3:35 pm - 4:05 pm    
The Discovery of Sotorasib (AMG 510): First-in-Class Investigational Covalent Inhibitor of KRAS G12C
Ryan Wurz, PhD, Amgen, USA

4:05 pm - 4:35 pm
Development of a Novel Cysteine Targeting RAD51 Inhibitor
Carola Neumann, MD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

4:35 pm - 5:05 pm
Targeting Cysteine of Superoxide Dismutase and the Main Protease of SARS-CoV-2 for Potential Therapeutic Solution
Samar Hasnain, PhD, University of Liverpool, UK

5:05 pm - 5:35 pm
Closing Remarks and Roundtable Discussion with the Experts
Bruce Freeman, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, USA


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SESSIONS

11:00 am - 11:45 am
Professional Development Session 1: Managing You Research Enterprise: From Starting Up to Maintaining a Post-Tenure Research Program

11:00 am - 11:45 am
Professional Development Session 2: Job Hunting as a Scientist: From Preparing an Application Package to Interviewing

12:30 pm - 1:15 pm
Professional Development Session 3: Clear, Concise and Cool - Tips for Effectively Communicating Science

It is essential to share your science with whomever will listen… but how do you get them to listen?  This workshop will include tips for all styles of communication, including the exciting but nerve wracking 15 min talk, social media, and the dreaded elevator pitch.  Walk away with some tangible ways to share your science—at SfRBM and beyond!

12:30 pm - 1:15 pm
Professional Development Session 4: Overcoming Challenges in Graduate School

OPENING DOORS EVENT
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Mentoring Matters: Building Mentoring Relationships with a Focus on Inclusion and Diversity
*Included with registration


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2021

ANNUAL CONFERENCE BEGINS

10:55 am - 11:00 am
SfRBM President's Welcome
Holly Van Remmen, PhD, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, USA - SfRBM President 

SUNRISE FREE RADICAL SCHOOL
11:00 am - 11:30 am
Back to the Basics
Chairs: Kimberly Dunham-Snary, Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada and Adam Case, PhD, Texas A&M University, USA
*Included with registration

11:00 am - 11:30 am
What are Free Radicals and Reactive Oxygen Species
Maria Clara Franco, PhD, Oregon State University, USA

11:00 am - 11:30 pm
Redox Signaling 101
Aimee L. Eggler, PhD, Villanova University, USA

PLENARY SESSION 1

11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Reactive Oxygen Species as mediators of Neuromuscular Interactions Underlying Age-Related Atrophy
Chairs: Malcolm J Jackson PhD DSc FRCPath FTPS, University of Liverpool, UK and Holly Van Remmen PhD, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, USA

This proposed session encompasses the conceptually novel “two-hit” hypothesis for sarcopenia wherein defects in neuronal function arising from altered redox homeostasis initiate disruption of neuromuscular Junctions (NMJs), but a second failure in ROS-mediated post-synaptic muscle processes is required to generate the full phenotype. The session leads through the basic mechanisms involved through to the proposals of novel ROS-targeted interventions aimed at restoring neuromuscular function in old age.

This session brings together experts in the fields of redox biochemistry, muscle physiology, mitochondrial function, neuromuscular synapse function and neurobiology using technical innovations including neuromuscular tissue engineering, redox proteomics, single cell transcriptomics and mass spectrometry to address the hypothesis of the potential for a major role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in mediating both pre- and post-synaptic disruption in old age.

11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Contribution of Both Pre- and Post-Synaptic Changes in the Initiation and Progression of Sarcopenia: Role of Altered ROS
Susan V Brooks, PhD, University of Michigan, USA

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Targeting Mitochondrial Hydrogen Peroxide to Mitigate Sarcopenia
Bumsoo Ahn, PhD, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, USA

12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
The Role of Altered Skeletal Muscle – Neuronal Cross-Talk in Sarcopenia
Anne McArdle PhD, University of Liverpool, UK

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Oxidation of Cysteine Thiols As Mediators of Skeletal Muscle Responses to Exercise
Malcolm J Jackson PhD DSc FRCPath FTPS, University of Liverpool, UK

PLENARY SESSION 2
11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Redox Signaling in the Nervous System
Chairs: Andrés Trostchansky, PhD, Universidad de la República, Uruguay and Eugenio Barone, PhD, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy

Oxidative stress and inflammatory processes greatly contribute to the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Cellular redox signaling and energy metabolism are impaired in neurons, astrocytes, or glial cells prompting a rise in free radical species and oxidatively damaged molecules, which accumulate and lead to cell dysfunction and death. The symposium will cover emerging evidence highlighting the impact of metabolism and redox signaling on genetic and epigenetic regulation of gene transcription as well as protein expression and activity, indicating the complexity of the molecular mechanisms deployed by brain cells to cope with oxidative stress and inflammatory processes.

11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Can Oxylipins and SPM be Markers of ALS? Lipidomic Analysis in Human Patients
Andrés Trostchansky, PhD, Universidad de la República, Uruguay

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Role of Sulfhydration in Age-related Neurodegenerative Diseases
Bindu D. Paul, MSc, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA

12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
Inhibition of Tetrahydrobiopterin Production Induces Analgesia by Compromising T Cell Mitochondrial Bioenergetics
Alexandra Latini, PhD, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm           
Insulin Signaling Regulates Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in the Brain: Insight for the Development of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Eugenio Barone, PhD, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy

ORAL PRESENTATIONS FROM SUBMITTED ABSTRACTS
2:00 pm - 3:45 pm
2 concurrent sessions

POSTER PRESENTATIONS
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Aging, Chemical Biology, Neurodegenerative Disease, Environmental Toxicology/Pharmacology​​

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2021

10:00 am - 10:45 am
Education Session sponsored by Baker Ruskinn

SUNRISE FREE RADICAL SCHOOL
11:00 am - 11:30 am
Back to the Basics
Chairs: Kimberly Dunham-Snary, Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada and Adam Case, PhD, Texas A&M University, USA
*Included with registration

11:00 am - 11:30 am
Mitochondrial ROS Generation - a Complex Matter
Paul S. Brookes, PhD, University of Rochester, USA

11:00 am - 11:30 am
Chemical and Cellular Aspects of Disulfide Redox Signaling
Edward Moreira Bahnson, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

PLENARY SESSION 3
11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Building, Upkeeping and Recycling Mitochondria
Chairs: Alicia Kowaltowski, MD, PhD, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil and Andrew Wojtovich, PhD, University of Rochester Medical Center, USA

Mitochondria are metabolic hubs that control redox signaling events. Mitochondrial redox changes can lead to diverse physiologic outputs depending on context, despite originating from the same organelle. This session will focus on how different mitochondrial redox signals lead to distinct changes in mitochondrial oxidant production, the regulation of their release from mitochondria, and the turnover and maintenance of mitochondrial membranes and DNA.

11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protein Translocation into Mitochondria
Carla Koehler, M.S.,PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Mitochondrial Redox Signaling in Acute Hypoxia
Antonio Martínez-Ruiz, PhD, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Spain

12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
Rescuing Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space Protein Biogenesis Under Oxidative Stress
Kostas Tokatlidis, PhD, University of Glasgow, Scotland

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Using Chemoptogenetic Approaches to Interrogate Mitochondrial Function
Ben Van Houten, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

PLENARY SESSION 4 
11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Disulfide Chemistry and Function in Cardiovascular Disease
Chairs: Philip Hogg, University of Sydney, Australia and Francisco Laurindo, MD, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Brazil

Since the discovery of protein disulfide bonds more than 50 years ago they have been assumed to be fully formed and inert in the mature protein. Recent findings have upended these fundamental assumptions about protein structure and function. Numerous disulfides exist in unbound form in mature proteins and a subset of the bonds, the allosteric disulfides, control the function of the protein when reduced or oxidised by vascular thiol isomerases.

11:30 am - 12:00 pm
PDI as a Biomarker And Therapeutic Target In Thrombosis
Robert Flaumenhaft, MD, PhD, BIDMC/Harvard Medical School, USA

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
How Functional Disulfides Regulate Proteins In Blood Flow
Frauke Graeter, PhD, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Germany

12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
Blood And Guts: Intestinal Mucins Shed Light On The Disulfide-Mediated Assembly Of Von Willebrand Factor
Deborah Fass, PhD, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Multiple Disulfide‐Bonded forms of Blood Proteins
Philip Hogg, PhD, University of Sydney, Australia

ORAL PRESENTATIONS FROM SUBMITTED ABSTRACTS
2:30 pm - 3:45 pm
2 concurrent sessions

POSTER PRESENTATIONS
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Cardiovascular and Pulmonary, Metabolism/Bioenergetics

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2021

SUNRISE FREE RADICAL SCHOOL 
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Back to the Basics
Chairs: Kimberly Dunham-Snary, Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada and Adam Case, PhD, Texas A&M University, USA
*Included with registration

11:00 am - 11:30 am
A Historical Overview of the Successes and Failures of Antioxidant Therapies
Chris Kevil, PhD, LSU Health Shreveport, USA

11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Translating Your Science to a Clinical Trial
Rebecca Oberley-Deegan, PhD, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA

PLENARY SESSION 5
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
New Advances in Targeting the Cellular Redox Environment as a Therapeutic Strategy
Chairs: Ines Batinic-Haberle, PhD, Duke University Medical Center, USA and Rebecca Oberley-Deegan, PhD, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA

Over the last decade the clinical development of drugs that target cellular redox environment has intensified. Two members of different classes of such compounds, a Mn porphyrin, BMX-001, and a Mn cyclic polyamine, GC4419, have progressed into Phase II/III clinical trials on cancer patients as protectors of normal tissues and anticancer agents.

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Metalloporphyrins: An Opportunity to Transform Radiation Therapy for High Grade Glioma Patients
Katherine B. Peters, PhD, MD, Duke University Cancer, USA

12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
Utilizing SOD Mimics to Protect Normal Tissues While Enhancing Tumor Responses to Cancer Therapy
Douglas R. Spitz, PhD, University of Iowa, USA

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Antioxidant and Pro-Oxidant Actions of Mn Porphyrin-Based Therapeutics
Ines Batinic-Haberle, PhD, University Medical Center Durham, USA

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm  
Understanding the Mechanisms by Which Manganese Porphyrins Protect from Radiation-Induced Toxicities
Rebecca Oberley-Deegan, PhD, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA

ORAL PRESENTATIONS FROM SUBMITTED ABSTRACTS
2:30 pm - 4:15 pm
2 concurrent sessions

POSTER PRESENTATIONS
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity