Conference Program

Daily Schedules

Wednesday
  Pre-Conference Workshop
  Opening Session
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2019

5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Registration/Information Desk

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2019

7:00 am – 6:30 pm
Registration/Information Desk

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
New Technologies and Informatics Strategies for Revealing the Interface Between Metabolism and Redox Biology
Chairs: Melissa Kemp, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, USA and Edward Chouchani, Ph.D. Harvard Medical School & Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, USA

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a diverse class of redox-active molecules each of which exhibit distinct dynamics, reactivity, and metabolic consequences. New analytical technologies associated with redox biology are having a major impact on both basic and translational research. The integration of redox biology into the rapidly advancing field of big data will likely change our perspective on both fundamental biological mechanisms and the development of novel therapeutics. This workshop will focus on how these tools can be applied to yield mechanistic insights into the role ROS and metabolism play as regulatory molecules in physiology and pathophysiology with a focus on bioenergetic function, metabolism and thiol networks encompassing advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics.

9:00 am – 9:05 am
Welcome / Part I Overview

9:05 am – 9:35 am
Identification and Manipulation of Metabolic Pethways that Control ROS Signaling in Phsyiology and Pathophysiology
Edward Chouchani, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School & Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, USA

9:35 am – 10:05 am 
TBD
Orian Shirihai, MD, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, USA 

10:05 am – 10:35 am
Informatics Methods for Integrating Comples Metabolic and Redox Data Sets
Karan Uppal, Ph.D., Emory University, USA

10:35 am – 10:55 am
Break

10:55 am – 11:20 am
The Integration of Metabolomics and Bioenergetics in Human Platelets and the Potential in Translational Research
Victor Drley-Usmar, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

11:20 am – 11:50 am
LC_MS and Bioinformatixs Solutions to Study Redox Biology Regualtion of Epilipidome
Maria Fedorova, Ph.D., Leipzig University, Germany

11:50 am – 1:00 pm
Lunch

1:00 pm – 1:05 pm
Part II Overview

1:05 pm – 1:35 pm
TBD
Kate Carroll, Ph.D., Scripps Research - Florida, USA

1:35 pm – 2:05 pm    
Personalized Models of Redox Metabolism from Transcriptomic Datasets
Melissa Kemp, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

2:05 pm – 2:35 pm
Harnessing the Sentinels of the Cysteine Redoxome with Proteomics and Bioinformatics
Jason Held, Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, USA

2:35 pm – 2:50 pm
Break

2:50 pm - 3:20 pm
TBD
Kivanc Birsoy, Ph.D., The Rockefeller University, USA

3:20 pm - 3:50 pm
Genetics to Uncover Redox Biology and Metabolic Pathways
Navdeep Chandel, Ph.D., Northwestern University, USA

3:50 pm - 4:00 pm
Summary


ANNUAL CONFERENCE BEGINS

5:00 pm - 7:10 pm
Opening Session

5:00 pm – 5:10 pm
SfRBM President's Welcome
Phyllis Dennery, MD, Brown University / Rhode Island Hospital, USA - SfRBM President 

PRESIDENTIAL PLENARY SESSION 
5:10 pm - 7:10 pm
From Bench to Bedside and Back: Redox in Medicine

5:10 pm – 5:40 pm     
Sex Specific Alterations in Mitochondrial Function and NF-kB Signaling in the tgCRND8 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease
Benedict Albensi, Ph.D., University of Manitoba, Canada

5:40 pm – 6:10 pm     
Mitochondria-Coupled Glucose Phosphorylation in Brain: Redox Role During Neurodevelopment in Health adn Disease 
Antonio Galina, Ph.D., Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

6:10 pm – 6:40 pm     
Visualizing Glutathione Utilization in the Zebrafish Embryo: When and Where
Alicia Timme-Laragy, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA

6:40 pm - 7:10 pm
Vitamin C and the Cancer Epigenome: Translating to Treatment of Leukemia
Kirsten Groenbaek, MD, DMSc, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

7:15 pm – 9:00 pm
Welcome Reception

7:15 pm – 8:30 pm
Trainee Welcome Event

9:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Hospitality

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2019

7:00 am - 6:30 pm
Registration/Information Desk

SUNRISE FREE RADICAL SCHOOL
8:00 am - 9:00 am
Back to the Basics
Chairs: Kimberly Dunham-Snary, Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada and Carola Neumann, MD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

PLENARY SESSION 1
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
Intracellular Metal Trafficking: Consequences for Redox Enzyme (alternative) Activities
Chairs: Marcelo Bonini, Ph.D, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA and Michael Graham Espey, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute, USA

Metals are central cofactors enabling redox reactions critical for the metabolism, DNA synthesis and repair, cellular and organ function. Their mishandling, release or misincorporation into proteins have significant consequences from loss of enzyme activity and destructive redox chemistry. More recently, the misincorporation of alternative ligand metals to enzyme active sites has been shown to lead to alternative activities vastly different from physiology. This session proposes to review and update the audience about the latest research in intracellular metal trafficking, incorporation to redox enzymes and the consequences of errors in metal handling for redox physiology and pathology.

9:30 am – 10:00 am   
TBD
Thomas O'Halloran, Ph.D., Northwestern University, USA

10:00 am – 10:30 am
Metals as Immune Regulators and Immune Weapons Against Pathogens
Valerie Culotta, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, USA

10:30 am – 11:00 am
Break

11:00 am – 11:30 am
Superoxide Dismutase of Peroxidase? A Metal Question
Marcelo Bonini, Ph.D., Medical College of Wisconsin, USA

11:30 am - 12:00 pm 
TBD
Suzy Torti, Ph.D., University of Connecticut Health Center, USA

PLENARY SESSION 2
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
Oxy-Inflammation, Redox Signaling and Autophagy: Crosstalk in Health and Disease
Chairs: Saverio Francesco Retta, Ph.D., University of Torino, Italy and Jianhua Zhang, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

This session aims at highlighting current knowledge of the crosstalk between redox signaling and autophagy, including mitophagy, in homeostasis and diseases. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that a tight interconnection between altered autophagy and abnormal redox signaling is integral to the development of major human diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, including neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. A comprehensive understanding of the complex molecular crosstalk between redox signaling and autophagy should therefore enable the development of innovative combination therapies for the prevention and treatment of complex human diseases. In particular, this session will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between mitochondria, redox signaling and autophagy in cellular responses to oxidative stress and inflammation and the emerging potential and persisting obstacles for therapeutic interventions.

9:30 am – 10:00 am
Autophagy, Mitochondria and Oxidative Stress: Crosstalk and Redox Signaling
Jianhua Zhang, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

10:00 am – 10:30 am
Crosstalk Between Redox Signaling and Autophagy in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Disease: From Basic Mechanisms to Therapeutic Strategies
Saverio Francesco Retta, Ph.D., University of Torino, Italy

10:30 am – 11:00 am
Break

11:00 am – 11:30 am 
The Pharmacology of Mitochondrial Cholesterol in Cell Signaling, Quality Control and Therapy Resistance
Michelangelo Campanella, PharmD, Ph.D., University of London, UK

11:30 am – 12:00 pm             
Autophagy Modulation for Precision Cancer (immuno)Therapy
Lorenzo Galluzzi, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medical College, USA

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
SfRBM Year in Review: Annual Member Meeting

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Lunch
Attendees on own

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Professional Development Session 1: How to PUblish a Strong Paper in Redox Biology and Avoid Fatal Errors/Rigor in Redox Methods
Trent Tipple, MD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA and Samantha Giordano-Mooga, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Professional Development Session 2Grant Review Section
Damian Guerra, Ph.D., University of Colorado, USA and Rajasekaran Namakkal, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

2:30 pm – 4:15 pm
Oral Presentations from Submitted Abstracts
3 concurrent sessions

4:15 pm – 6:45 pm
Formal Poster Presentations

6:45 pm – 9:00 pm
Opening Doors Event: Professionalism - Building Success in Science
Dr. Sonia Flores is a long standing member of the redox community and a national leader on diversity, inclusion, and equity. She is a member of the NIH working group that develops recommendations on how to address issues regarding unprofessional behavior in science and medicine. This interactive Opening Doors session will address harassment and bias in the field of redox biology and medicine and approaches to minimize such problems in the community.

9:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Hospitality

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2019

7:00 am - 6:30 pm
Registration/Information Desk

SUNRISE FREE RADICAL SCHOOL
8:00 am - 9:00 am
Back to the Basics
Chairs: Kimberly Dunham-Snary, Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada and Carola Neumann, MD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

PLENARY SESSION 3
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
Beyond the Cell: Oxidation of the Extracellular Matrix in Development, Disease and Treatment
Chairs: Michael Davies, D.Phil., University of Copenhagen, Denmark and Yvonne-Janssen-Heininger, The University of Vermont, USA

The redox environment inside cells is very different to that outside the cell, and it is clear that many extracellular environments are both more oxidizing and also subject to extensive oxidation. This difference in redox environments results in significant changes in oxidation chemistry and biology, altered redox equilibria, and antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidation events outside cells also play a critical role in driving many diseases, particularly in fibrotic pathologies. Many extracellular proteins are highly abundant, long-lived and relatively poorly protected against damage. They can therefore accumulate high levels of modification during ageing and disease, resulting in their increasing use as biomarkers of long-term oxidative stress. However, these extracellular modifications are not always innocent bystanders as oxidized extracellular matrix materials are increasingly recognized to play a key role in determining cell function and fate. Extracellular oxidation is critical for tissue assembly and development, and specific and localized oxidation is essential to life, particularly with regard to tissue architecture and function. Deliberate exogenous oxidant formation also appears to be a promising method of repairing tissue damage, with animal and human trials indicating that controlled oxidation can be of major therapeutic use in tissue repair after injury. This session will examine extracellular oxidation from chemistry through to the bedside, and encompass studies on the role of oxidants in tissue development, the chemistry and biology of disease, and the use of oxidants to effect tissue repair.

9:30 am – 10:00 am
Redox Perturbations, Extracellular Matrix and Lung Fibrosis
Victor Thannickal, MD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

10:00 am – 10:30 am 
Modifications to the Disease Structure of Arterial Wall as a Driver of Cardiovascular Disease
Michael Davies, D.Phil., University of Copenhagen, Denmark

10:30 am – 11:00 am
Break

11:00 am – 11:30 am
Peroxidase-mediated Assembly and Repair of Tissues in Develpment and Disease
Gautam (Jay) Bhave, MD, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA

11:30 am - 12:00 pm 
Light-Activated Tissue Repair and Regeneration
Robert Redmond, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School, USA

PLENARY SESSION 4 
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
Nrf n' Turf: Nrf2 Redox Signaling and Strategies ot Drug Cancer Cell Metabolism
Chair: Michael Graham Espey, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute, USA

The NRF2-KEAP1-ARE pathway is a key regulator of the cellular redox state, and pivotal in defense against xenobiotic and oxidative stresses. Cancer cells exploit NRF2-KEAP1 to alter redox states leading to metabolic reprogramming and resistance. Speakers in this session will discuss emergent findings that reveal the mechanistic underpinnings of oncogenic corruption in Nrf2-mediated signaling, with attendees gaining an integrative understanding of redox, metabolism and cancer phenotypes. Our session will challenge the dogma that cancer metabolism is not druggable. Each speaker will explore how Nrf2-oncogene addiction in cancer cells potentially creates vulnerabilities that may be targeted using novel translational strategies.

9:30 am – 10:00 am
Investigation of Selective NRF2-Dependent Metabolic Liabilities
Gina DeNicola, Ph.D., Moffitt Cancer Center, USA

10:00 am – 10:30 am
Redx Sensors to Map Druggable Co-dependencies in NRF2 Cancers
Liron Bar-Peled, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School, USA

10:30 am – 11:00 am
Break

11:00 am – 11:30 am
Translating Nrf2-regulated Translation
Iok In Christine Chio, Ph.D., Columbia University, USA

11:30 am – 12:00 pm 
Mutual Exclusivity of Nrf2 and Engineering Cancer Metabolism
Thales Papagiannakopoulos, Ph.D., NYU Langone Medical Center, USA

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm     
SfRBM Discovery Award Lecture

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Lunch 
Attendees on own

12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
Special Session
Sponsored by Baker Ruskinn
Lunch will be provided to all session attendees

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Professional Development Session 3: Transitionting from research Assitant Professors into Tenure Track Positions
Benoit Boivin, Ph.D., SUNY Polytechnic Institute, USA, Jack Lancaster, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh and Karina Ckless, SUNY Plattsburgh, USA

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Professional Development Session 4: Sexual Harassment and Other Misbehaviors in Science

2:30 pm – 4:15 pm
Oral Presentations from Submitted Abstracts
3 concurrent sessions

4:15 pm – 6:45 pm
Formal Poster Presentations

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRBM & Redox Biology Editors Reception

9:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Hospitality

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2019

7:00 am - 6:30 pm
Registration/Information Desk

SUNRISE FREE RADICAL SCHOOL 
8:00 am - 9:00 am
Back to the Basics
Chairs: Kimberly Dunham-Snary, Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada and Carola Neumann, MD, University of Pittsburgh, USA

PLENARY SESSION 5
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
Redox Signaling in Exercise Adaptation
Chairs: Siobhan Craige, Ph.D., Virginia Tech, USA and David Marcienk, Ph.D., University of Washington, USA

Exercise is one of the most powerful strategies to prevent age-related chronic diseases and improve healthspan. Reactive oxygen species produced during exercise are critical mediators of the adaptive responses to physical activity. However, the mechanisms by which redox dependent signaling alters adaptive processes and affects systemic responses to exercise remain largely unknown. A more complete understanding of the sources of oxidant production, the relative effects on redox status, and the local and systemic redox signaling in response to exercise is important for designing strategies to exploit the beneficial effects of exercise for the prevention and reversal of many chronic conditions.

9:30 am – 10:00 am   
Acute Response to Running: Learning from the -Omics of MoTrPAC
Karyn Esser, Ph.D., University of Florida, USA

10:00 am – 10:30 am
EcSOD in the Health Benefits of Exercise
Zhen Yan, Ph.D., University of Virginia School of Medicine, USA
                        
10:30 am – 11:00 am
Break

11:00 am – 11:30 am 
Redox Proteomics
Brian McDonagh, Ph.D., National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland

11:30 am  - 12:00 pm     
Liver Macrohages Regulate the Antioxidant Response
Valerio Azzimato, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm
New Member Welcome Meeting

12:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Lunch
Attendees on own

2:30 pm – 4:15 pm
Oral Presentations from Submitted Abstracts
3 concurrent sessions

4:15 pm – 6:45 pm
Formal Poster Presentations

7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Closing Awards Banquet

9:30 pm - 11:00 pm
Hospitality

SfRBM 2019 officially adjourns after the Closing Awards Banquet on Saturday, November 23.