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Free Radical Biology and Medicine (FRBM)

Chronicles of a reductase: Biochemistry, genetics and physio-pathological role of GSNOR

Publication date: September 2017 Source:Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Volume 110 Author(s): Salvatore Rizza, Giuseppe Filomeni S-nitrosylation is a major redox posttranslational modification involved in cell signaling. The steady state concentration of S-nitrosylated proteins depends on the balance between the relative ability to generate nitric oxide (NO) via NO synthase and to reduce nitrosothiols by denitrosylases. Numerous works have been published in last decades regarding the role of NO and S-nitrosylation in the regulation of protein structure and function, and in driving cellular activities in vertebrates. Notwithstanding an increasing number of observations indicates that impairment of denitrosylation equally affects cellular homeostasis, there is still no report providing comprehensive knowledge on the impact that denitrosylation has on maintaining correct physiological processes and organ activities. Among denitrosylases, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) represents the prototype enzyme to disclose how denitrosylation plays a crucial role in tuning NO-bioactivity and how much it deeply impacts on cell homeostasis and human patho-physiology. In this review we attempt to illustrate the history of GSNOR discovery and provide the evidence so far reported in support of GSNOR implications in development and human disease. Graphical abstract

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Alteration of Nrf2 and Glutamate Cysteine Ligase expression contribute to lesions growth and fibrogenesis in ectopic endometriosis

Publication date: September 2017 Source:Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Volume 110 Author(s): L. Marcellin, P. Santulli, S. Chouzenoux, O. Cerles, C. Nicco, B. Dousset, M. Pallardy, S. Kerdine-Römer, PA. Just, C. Chapron, F. Batteux The redox-sensitive nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2) controls endogenous antioxidant enzymes’ transcription and protects against oxidative damage which is triggered by inflammation and known to favor progression of endometriosis. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase (GCL), a target gene of NRF2, is the first enzyme in the synthesis cascade of glutathione, an important endogenous antioxidant. Sixty-one patients, with thorough surgical examination of the abdominopelvic cavity, were recruited for the study: 31 with histologically-proven endometriosis and 30 disease-free women taken as controls. Expressions of NRF2 and GCL were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in eutopic and ectopic endometria from endometriosis-affected women and in endometrium of disease-free women. Ex vivo stromal and epithelial cells were extracted and purified from endometrial and endometriotic biopsies to explore expression of NRF2 and GCL in both stromal and epithelial compartments by western blot. Finally, in order to strengthen the role of NRF2 in endometriosis pathogenesis, we evaluated the drop of NRF2 expression in a mouse model of endometriosis using NRF2 knockout (NRF2-/-) mice. The mRNA levels of NRF2 and GCL were significantly lower in ectopic endometria of endometriosis-affected women compared to eutopic endometria of disease-free women. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the decreased expression of both NRF2 and GCL in ectopic endometriotic tissues compared to eutopic endometria of endometriosis-affected and disease-free women. Immunoblotting revealed a significant decreased of NRF2 and GCL expression in epithelial and stroma cells from ectopic lesions of endometriosis-affected women compared to eutopic endometria from controls. Usi

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Cyclophosphamide and acrolein induced oxidative stress leading to deterioration of metaphase II mouse oocyte quality

Publication date: September 2017 Source:Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Volume 110 Author(s): Roohi Jeelani, Sana N. Khan, Faten Shaeib, Hamid-Reza Kohan-Ghadr, Sarah R. Aldhaheri, Tohid Najafi, Mili Thakur, Robert Morris, Husam M. Abu-Soud Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat ovarian, breast, and hematological cancers as well as autoimmune disorders. Such chemotherapy is associated with reproductive failure and premature ovarian insufficiency. The mechanism by which CTX and/or its main metabolite, acrolein, affect female fertility remains unclear, but it is thought to be caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effect of CTX on metaphase II mouse oocytes obtained from treated animals (120mg/kg, 24h of single treatment), and oocytes directly exposed to increasing concentrations of CTX and acrolein (n=480; 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100μM) with and without cumulus cells (CCs) for 45min which correlates to the time of maximum peak plasma concentrations after administration. Oocytes were fixed and subjected to indirect immunofluorescence and were scored based on microtubule spindle structure (MT) and chromosomal alignment (CH). Generation of ROS was evaluated using the Cellular Reactive Oxygen Species Detection Assay Kit. Deterioration of oocyte quality was noted when oocytes were obtained from CTX treated mice along with CTX and acrolein treated oocytes in a dose-dependent manner as shown by an increase in poor scores. Acrolein had an impact at a significantly lower level as compared to CTX, plateau at 10μM versus 50μM, respectively. These variation is are associated with the higher amount of ROS generated with acrolein exposure as compared to CTX (p<0.05). Utilization of antioxidant therapy and acrolein scavengers may mitigate the damaging effects of these compounds and help women undergoing such treatment. Graphical abstract

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Paradoxical roles of dual oxidases in cancer biology

Publication date: September 2017 Source:Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Volume 110 Author(s): Andrew C. Little, Arvis Sulovari, Karamatullah Danyal, David E. Heppner, David J. Seward, Albert van der Vliet Dysregulated oxidative metabolism is a well-recognized aspect of cancer biology, and many therapeutic strategies are based on targeting cancers by altering cellular redox pathways. The NADPH oxidases (NOXes) present an important enzymatic source of biological oxidants, and the expression and activation of several NOX isoforms are frequently dysregulated in many cancers. Cell-based studies have demonstrated a role for several NOX isozymes in controlling cell proliferation and/or cell migration, further supporting a potential contributing role for NOX in promoting cancer. While various NOX isoforms are often upregulated in cancers, paradoxical recent findings indicate that dual oxidases (DUOXes), normally prominently expressed in epithelial lineages, are frequently suppressed in epithelial-derived cancers by epigenetic mechanisms, although the functional relevance of such DUOX silencing has remained unclear. This review will briefly summarize our current understanding regarding the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NOXes in cancer biology, and focus on recent observations indicating the unique and seemingly opposing roles of DUOX enzymes in cancer biology. We will discuss current knowledge regarding the functional properties of DUOX, and recent studies highlighting mechanistic consequences of DUOX1 loss in lung cancer, and its consequences for tumor invasiveness and current anticancer therapy. Finally, we will also discuss potentially unique roles for the DUOX maturation factors. Overall, a better understanding of mechanisms that regulate DUOX and the functional consequences of DUOX silencing in cancer may offer valuable new diagnostic insights and novel therapeutic opportunities. Graphical abstract

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Overweight in elderly people induces impaired autophagy in skeletal muscle

Publication date: September 2017 Source:Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Volume 110 Author(s): Yaiza Potes, Beatriz de Luxán-Delgado, Susana Rodriguez-González, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira Guimarães, Juan J. Solano, María Fernández-Fernández, Manuel Bermúdez, Jose A. Boga, Ignacio Vega-Naredo, Ana Coto-Montes Sarcopenia is the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and quality associated with aging. Changes in body composition, especially in skeletal muscle and fat mass are crucial steps in the development of chronic diseases. We studied the effect of overweight on skeletal muscle tissue in elderly people without reaching obesity to prevent this extreme situation. Overweight induces a progressive protein breakdown reflected as a progressive withdrawal of anabolism against the promoted catabolic state leading to muscle wasting. Protein turnover is regulated by a network of signaling pathways. Muscle damage derived from overweight displayed by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces inflammation and insulin resistance and forces the muscle to increase requirements from autophagy mechanisms. Our findings showed that failure of autophagy in the elderly deprives it to deal with the cell damage caused by overweight. This insufficiently efficient autophagy leads to an accumulation of p62 and NBR1, which are robust markers of protein aggregations. This impaired autophagy affects myogenesis activity. Depletion of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) without links to variations in myostatin levels in overweight patients suggest a possible reduction of satellite cells in muscle tissue, which contributes to declined muscle quality. This discovery has important implications that improve the understanding of aged-related atrophy caused by overweight and demonstrates how impaired autophagy is one of the main responsible mechanisms that aggravate muscle wasting. Therefore, autophagy could be an interesting target for therapeutic interventions in humans against muscle impairment di

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Redox Biology

Quantitative biology of hydrogen peroxide signaling

Publication date: October 2017 Source:Redox Biology, Volume 13 Author(s): Fernando Antunes, Paula Matos Brito Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) controls signaling pathways in cells by oxidative modulation of the activity of redox sensitive proteins denominated redox switches. Here, quantitative biology concepts are applied to review how H2O2 fulfills a key role in information transmission. Equations described lay the foundation of H2O2 signaling, give new insights on H2O2 signaling mechanisms, and help to learn new information from common redox signaling experiments. A key characteristic of H2O2 signaling is that the ratio between reduction and oxidation of redox switches determines the range of H2O2 concentrations to which they respond. Thus, a redox switch with low H2O2-dependent oxidability and slow reduction rate responds to the same range of H2O2 concentrations as a redox switch with high H2O2-dependent oxidability, but that is rapidly reduced. Yet, in the first case the response time is slow while in the second case is rapid. H2O2 sensing and transmission of information can be done directly or by complex mechanisms in which oxidation is relayed between proteins before oxidizing the final regulatory redox target. In spite of being a very simple molecule, H2O2 has a key role in cellular signaling, with the reliability of the information transmitted depending on the inherent chemical reactivity of redox switches, on the presence of localized H2O2 pools, and on the molecular recognition between redox switches and their partners. Graphical abstract

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Direct 1O2 optical excitation: A tool for redox biology

Publication date: October 2017 Source:Redox Biology, Volume 13 Author(s): Alfonso Blázquez-Castro Molecular oxygen (O2) displays very interesting properties. Its first excited state, commonly known as singlet oxygen (1O2), is one of the so-called Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). It has been implicated in many redox processes in biological systems. For many decades its role has been that of a deleterious chemical species, although very positive clinical applications in the Photodynamic Therapy of cancer (PDT) have been reported. More recently, many ROS, and also 1O2, are in the spotlight because of their role in physiological signaling, like cell proliferation or tissue regeneration. However, there are methodological shortcomings to properly assess the role of 1O2 in redox biology with classical generation procedures. In this review the direct optical excitation of O2 to produce 1O2 will be introduced, in order to present its main advantages and drawbacks for biological studies. This photonic approach can provide with many interesting possibilities to understand and put to use ROS in redox signaling and in the biomedical field. Graphical abstract

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European contribution to the study of ROS: A summary of the findings and prospects for the future from the COST action BM1203 (EU-ROS)

Publication date: October 2017 Source:Redox Biology, Volume 13 Author(s): Javier Egea, Isabel Fabregat, Yves M. Frapart, Pietro Ghezzi, Agnes Görlach, Thomas Kietzmann, Kateryna Kubaichuk, Ulla G. Knaus, Manuela G. Lopez, Gloria Olaso-Gonzalez, Andreas Petry, Rainer Schulz, Jose Vina, Paul Winyard, Kahina Abbas, Opeyemi S. Ademowo, Catarina B. Afonso, Ioanna Andreadou, Haike Antelmann, Fernando Antunes, Mutay Aslan, Markus M. Bachschmid, Rui M. Barbosa, Vsevolod Belousov, Carsten Berndt, David Bernlohr, Esther Bertrán, Alberto Bindoli, Serge P. Bottari, Paula M. Brito, Guia Carrara, Ana I. Casas, Afroditi Chatzi, Niki Chondrogianni, Marcus Conrad, Marcus S. Cooke, João G. Costa, Antonio Cuadrado, Pham My-Chan Dang, Barbara De Smet, Bilge Debelec–Butuner, Irundika H.K. Dias, Joe Dan Dunn, Amanda J. Edson, Mariam El Assar, Jamel El-Benna, Péter Ferdinandy, Ana S. Fernandes, Kari E. Fladmark, Ulrich Förstermann, Rashid Giniatullin, Zoltán Giricz, Anikó Görbe, Helen Griffiths, Vaclav Hampl, Alina Hanf, Jan Herget, Pablo Hernansanz-Agustín, Melanie Hillion, Jingjing Huang, Serap Ilikay, Pidder Jansen-Dürr, Vincent Jaquet, Jaap A. Joles, Balaraman Kalyanaraman, Danylo Kaminskyy, Mahsa Karbaschi, Marina Kleanthous, Lars-Oliver Klotz, Bato Korac, Kemal Sami Korkmaz, Rafal Koziel, Damir Kračun, Karl-Heinz Krause, Vladimír Křen, Thomas Krieg, João Laranjinha, Antigone Lazou, Huige Li, Antonio Martínez-Ruiz, Reiko Matsui, Gethin J. McBean, Stuart P. Meredith, Joris Messens, Verónica Miguel, Yuliya Mikhed, Irina Milisav, Lidija Milković, Antonio Miranda-Vizuete, Miloš Mojović, María Monsalve, Pierre-Alexis Mouthuy, John Mulvey, Thomas Münzel, Vladimir Muzykantov, Isabel T.N. Nguyen, Matthias Oelze, Nuno G. Oliveira, Carlos M. Palmeira, Nikoletta Papaevgeniou, Aleksandra Pavićević, Brandán Pedre, Fabienne Peyrot, Mari

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Mitochondria-meditated pathways of organ failure upon inflammation

Publication date: October 2017 Source:Redox Biology, Volume 13 Author(s): Andrey V. Kozlov, Jack R. Lancaster, Andras T. Meszaros, Adelheid Weidinger Liver failure induced by systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) is often associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but the mechanism linking SIRS and mitochondria-mediated liver failure is still a matter of discussion. Current hypotheses suggest that causative events could be a drop in ATP synthesis, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, specific changes in mitochondrial morphology, impaired Ca2+ uptake, generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS), turnover of mitochondria and imbalance in electron supply to the respiratory chain. The aim of this review is to critically analyze existing hypotheses, in order to highlight the most promising research lines helping to prevent liver failure induced by SIRS. Evaluation of the literature shows that there is no consistent support that impaired Ca++ metabolism, electron transport chain function and ultrastructure of mitochondria substantially contribute to liver failure. Moreover, our analysis suggests that the drop in ATP levels has protective rather than a deleterious character. Recent data suggest that the most critical mitochondrial event occurring upon SIRS is the release of mtROS in cytoplasm, which can activate two specific intracellular signaling cascades. The first is the mtROS-mediated activation of NADPH-oxidase in liver macrophages and endothelial cells; the second is the acceleration of the expression of inflammatory genes in hepatocytes. The signaling action of mtROS is strictly controlled in mitochondria at three points, (i) at the site of ROS generation at complex I, (ii) the site of mtROS release in cytoplasm via permeability transition pore, and (iii) interaction with specific kinases in cytoplasm. The systems controlling mtROS-signaling include pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide, Ca2+ and NADPH-oxidase. Analysis of the literature suggests that

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Redox signaling during hypoxia in mammalian cells

Publication date: October 2017 Source:Redox Biology, Volume 13 Author(s): Kimberly A. Smith, Gregory B. Waypa, Paul T. Schumacker Hypoxia triggers a wide range of protective responses in mammalian cells, which are mediated through transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Redox signaling in cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) occurs through the reversible oxidation of cysteine thiol groups, resulting in structural modifications that can change protein function profoundly. Mitochondria are an important source of ROS generation, and studies reveal that superoxide generation by the electron transport chain increases during hypoxia. Other sources of ROS, such as the NAD(P)H oxidases, may also generate oxidant signals in hypoxia. This review considers the growing body of work indicating that increased ROS signals during hypoxia are responsible for regulating the activation of protective mechanisms in diverse cell types. Graphical abstract

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